Charter a Cessna Citation Latitude

Charter a Cessna Citation Latitude



Charter any Cessna Citation Business Jet. Cessna announced development of a new Citation that will have the company’s first stand-up cabin with a flat floor. The new jet is named the Latitude.
The Citation jet family has many models to choose from.
Cessna’s two largest cabin jets, the Ten and Sovereign, have dropped aisles with about 5 feet, 8 inches of headroom. The new Latitude will have a flat cabin floor with 6 feet of headroom in the center.
The Latitude is a derivative of the Sovereign using essentially the same wing and tail sections, and retaining the same primary systems. At the announcement Cessna had not selected an engine for the Latitude but overhaul interval targets for the engine are 3,000 hours to hot section inspection, and 6,000-hour TBO. Pratt and Whitney PW306C engines power the Sovereign and do have a 6,000-hour TBO.
The Latitude will have Garmin’s new G5000 avionics system that has also been selected for the Citation Ten now in development. The G5000 system features three 14-inch screens that can be “windowed” into several partitions. The G5000 is controlled by four touch-screen units with two each in the center pedestal and one each on the outboard corners of the instrument panel. Each touch-screen unit can control all avionics functions so both pilots can always reach a touch screen with either hand.
Cessna expects the Latitude to have a full fuel payload of 1,000 pounds and an NBAA maximum range with four passengers of 2,000 nautical miles. The maximum operating altitude will be 45,000 feet, but in another Citation first, the cabin altitude at that flight level will be 6,000 feet instead of the 8,000 feet the rules allow.
The Latitude maximum cruise speed goal is 442 knots at an altitude of 35,000 feet, and time to climb to 43,000 feet is targeted at 23 minutes. The airplane can continue the climb without stepping all the way to 45,000 feet under ISA conditions. Maximum weight takeoff runway requirement is planned for 3,900 feet.
The standard interior for the Latitude includes six passenger chairs and a two-place divan directly across from the entry door. The passenger cabin is just over 16 feet long with a large lav at the rear. The external baggage capacity is approximately 100 cubic feet, similar to the baggage room in the Sovereign.
Another first for Citation on the Latitude will be a powered airstair door. But the airplane will retain the fully mechanical flight controls of the Sovereign, along with the same electrically powered wing flaps. The only hydraulically operated surfaces are the spoilers and speed brakes.
The Latitude wing will have the same 16.3-degree leading edge sweep used on the Sovereign along with a straight trailing edge. At 72.3 feet, the wingspan – including new winglets – on the Latitude will be about 9 feet greater than the Sovereign. The Latitude will need a new wing-to-body fairing to account for the larger fuselage tube diameter, which will be one of several critical areas to control drag.
Base price of the Latitude is set at $14.9 million in 2011 dollars, placing the cost squarely between the longer-range Sovereign and the smaller and shorter-range Citation XLS+. Cessna is offering a million bucks off the price for initial orders.
Cessna has set an ambitious schedule for Latitude development since the program was given the green light just a few weeks before the announcement. First flight is set for the middle of 2014, certification a year later, and entry into service in the second half of 2015.

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Inside Qatar Airways’ $45 Million Private Jet

Inside Qatar Airways’ $45 Million Private Jet



“Farnborough International Airshow” presented by Airbus.

On Qatar Airways’ newest private jet a flight from New York to London costs $160,000.

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Top 5 Best Seaplanes In The World

Top 5 Best Seaplanes In The World



MojoGrip online
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Amphibian airplanes can be a relatively new concept even to pilots. That’s because most of us train in tricycle, land airplanes. But the fact is 70% of planet is covered by water so it only makes sense that we have airplanes that can land or float on water. Well we do, and today we are checking out 5 of the best light modern sea planes available in the industry.

Being that these aircraft are light, and many of them in the LSA category, you get limited amount space/useful load and you’re traveling no more than 120 miles per hour for the most part. Here are the airplanes listed:

1. Icon A5 – Arguably one of the most technologically advanced light plane built in the last 20 years. The Icon A5 stuck a chord with many old and new pilots, particularly those who want to fly just for fun or sport. The airplane is known for its good handling capabilities and anti-stall safety feature. But honestly there is no such thing as anti-stall for an airplane. Due to troubles and some failed promises over the years, the ICON initial goal to take over the sport aviation market has somewhat stalled. There are very few production airplanes flying today, and pilot/owners seem to be very happy with the product. Below are specs for the A5.

USEFUL LOAD: 430-550 lbs
RANGE: Up to 491 miles
SPEED: Up to 109 mph
PRICE: $269,000

2. Super Petrel LS – If you’re in the US, You probably haven’t heard about this amphibious plane. Me either, not until researching for this video. The Petrel is a French/Brazilian design and although popular around the world, its a bit quiet here in the United States. With all the cool features in the airplane though, which includes double wings, and a turbo charged engine upgrade, all for $175,000. Not bad, hopefully the company gets more love and coverage. Below are specs for the Super Petrel.

USEFUL LOAD: 537 lbs
RANGE: Up to 590 miles
SPEED: Up to 115 mph
PRICE: $175,000

3. Vickers Waves – An Icon A5 lookalike but much sleeker. This airplane is designed by founder and owner Paul Vicker from new Zealand. Lots of cool features including those folding wings also seen the Icon A5. But the Vicker is still in design phase. There is no flying prototype yet to confirm any performance numbers. Below are specs for the Vicker Waves.

USEFUL LOAD: 500 lbs
RANGE: Up to 828 miles
SPEED: Up to 138 mph
PRICE: $180,000

4. MVP – The name alone draws special attention. MVP is another light seaplane that flames to be the most practical of all. With this plane you can fly on land, water and snow. You can also take it fishing, camping and much more. Perfect airplane for the all the adventurous daredevils out there. Below are specs for the MVP.

USEFUL LOAD: 450 lbs
RANGE: N/A
SPEED: Up to 120 mph
PRICE: $189,000

5. Searey – Available in both light sport and experimental with your choice of engine, ranging from the Rotax 912, 914 or 915. The Searey airplane is hands down the best bank for the money. No it’s not the best looking plane when compared to the other sleeker ones like the A5 or the Vicker, but you get all the same feature and then some with the Searey. And a complete light aircraft will only cost you $125,000. Below are specs for the Searey.

USEFUL LOAD: 450 lbs
RANGE: Up to 416 miles
SPEED: Up to 120 mph
PRICE: $125,000

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American Air Charter NA-265-65 Sabreliner 65 – Flight from and to Spirit of St. Louis (SUS), USA

American Air Charter NA-265-65 Sabreliner 65 – Flight from and to Spirit of St. Louis (SUS), USA



Rockwell International NA-265-65 Sabreliner 65 / N58HT
American Air Charter Inc / GTW58
Departure: Spirit of St. Louis (SUS), USA (Rwy 08R)
Arrival: Spirit of St. Louis (SUS), USA (Rwy 08R)
Date: March 2nd, 2018
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A pleasure flight onboard a rare Sabreliner around St. Louis. N58HT is operated by American Air Charter based at Spirit of St. Louis Airport. The flight took us around the area including a visit to Perryville Municipal Airport (PCD), where – if I understood correctly – this aircraft was built in 1981. Later on the flight took us close to St. Louis downtown followed by a missed approach at Spirit of St. Louis Airport. Thanks to the very friendly crew and American Air Charter staff for making this flight possible.

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